All tagged contemporary art

Walk this way

One of the great things about the Watari-um is that you’re always in for a surprise. John Lurie is a musician, co-founder of The Lounge Lizards, a jazz ensemble. He is an actor, director and producer. And he is a painter, focusing on this art form since his 2000 diagnosis of Lyme disease. Art lovers can be snobby about these multi-hyphenates, often thinking one person can’t be good at all these different types of art. But his paintings. His paintings, mostly watercolor and some oil, are really beautiful. Quirky, ephemeral, with a sense of humor, and with nods of Klee and Moreau and Basquiat.

Weavers of Worlds — A Century of Flux in Japanese Modern / Contemporary Art —

This exhibition commemorates the reopening of the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo (MOT) and uses the occasion to present a survey of Japanese art of the last 100 years. Different elements of life in Japan across the years are “woven” into this exhibition of artwork. Beginning with 1914 through today, the artwork, mostly paintings, are grouped chronologically, using events such as the Great Kanto Earthquake and World War II, and a variety of artistic themes (light, words, universality) to group works by chapter. The exhibition also includes artwork relating to the Kiba district where the museum is located, highlighting the dramatic changes the area has witnessed in the last 100 years.

Roppongi Crossing 2019: Connexions

Roppongi Crossing is a contemporary art exhibition held every three years. The work of 25 Japanese artists/groups (collectives), born in the 1970s and 1980s, is on display. There are several large scale works, videos, cats, a simulated ocean, glowing honey jars, and more. Themes of connection and disparity in the age of the internet, artificial intelligence, and the current state of Japan are explored.

Sophie Calle: Exquisite Pain

Reading any news about art in Tokyo, it is hard to miss Sophie Calle, that her work has appeared in four different venues in February: a video installation at Shibuya Crossing (finished), a gallery show at Perrotin in Roppongi (the above photo), Parce que at Gallery Koyangi in Ginza, and Exquisite Pain: From the Hara Museum Collection. Exquisite Pain was previously shown at the Hara Museum in 1999-2000, when the museum acquired the entire collection, and is now shown again in its entirety. Calle demonstrates the pain of a romantic breakup through a countdown, using letters, photographs, and other mementos to tick off the days. The count up alternates Calle’s recounting of the breakup with painful stories and accompanying photographs from the stories of others.

Awakenings: Art in Society in Asia 1960s-1990s

The theme for this exhibition covers quite a bit of ground: societal change in eleven Asian countries as expressed through art. As stated in the exhibition text, this is not art for art’s sake but rather art for the masses, art as critique, art as documentation of change. There are several videos of varying lengths, photographs, sculptures, prints, drawings, paintings and documentation of a variety of performance art.

Kazuki Umezawa x Taku Obata “Hyper Landscape”

This exhibition includes Kazuki Umezawa’s colorful paintings, video stills and printed images, which completely cover the gallery walls from the 2nd floor gallery to the 4th. The paintings, which include internet images that are pieced together in collage and adorned with brightly colored and glitter acrylic paint. His works continue on the third floor while Taku Obata’s large, wooden statues stand on the 2nd floor and his video plays on the 4th floor.

Mami Kosemura: Phantasies Over Time

Mami Kosemura presents what appears at first glance to be classic art - still lifes and portraits. Taking time with the works reveals modern twists. A still life of fruit reveals decay; the flowers in the vase are wilted and fresh. The artist combines photography and video to highlight change over time.