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Useful information with a point of view.

A Trip through the Tokyo Station Gallery Collection

A Trip through the Tokyo Station Gallery Collection

In a nutshell
Tokyo Station Gallery presents its art collection, with over 100 works by 60 artists, grouped by themes: railway art, city and suburbs, people, abstract and Picasso. Because the collection covers a wide range of subjects, from railway art to Picasso, it seems somewhat disjointed. However, there are some beautiful pieces. Some favorites include photographs by Naoki Hanjo, a beautiful abstract by Yoko Matsumoto, and Seated Woman with Yellow Background by Picasso.

The venue
The Tokyo Station Gallery is located near the Marunouchi North Exit in Tokyo Station. The gallery entrance is on the first floor with the exhibition space on the second and third floors.

English? (labels/audio guides/handouts)
The good news - there’s an audio guide in English available through a website accessed on your phone using the museum’s free wifi. There are 21 entries, five for the chapter titles, leaving explanations for 16 works. The not so great news - the exhibit has over 100 items on display.  Nothing about the pieces is in English, including the artist’s name, the dates, the name of the work or any of the other wall text. 

The feels
As this is a display of the gallery’s collection, the exhibit does not have a very cohesive theme. 

Appeal
Unless you’re a die hard Picasso fan, only for those who like art and have some spare time.

How far out?
Centrally located right in Tokyo Station. 

How much time? 
About half an hour. 

How much money?
¥900 for general admission

Until when?
February 12, 2018

Rating: make a special trip, see it if you’re in the area or have some free time, see it only if you like this specific type of art
If you’re in the area and have time to spare.

Links:
http://www.ejrcf.or.jp/gallery/english/archive_201712.html

 

Noriyoshi Ohrai: The Illustrator

Noriyoshi Ohrai: The Illustrator

Leandro Erlich: Seeing and Believing

Leandro Erlich: Seeing and Believing