All in Exhibitions

Shiota Chiharu: The Soul Trembles

Red strings, boats, large-scale. This artist’s work is immediately recognizable to those who have seen even one of her larger installations. But these short descriptions of her artwork are reductive and can’t adequately convey the experience of standing in her stunning installations. If you are in Tokyo, you will be lucky enough to see the largest solo exhibition of her work, which spans 25 years of her career. In addition to several large installations, there are sculptures, videos, photographs, drawings and more.

teamLab Borderless

If you’re in Japan and on any social media, it’s hard not to know something about teamLab. The imminently Instagrammable digital art museum is designed for selfies to share. There are rooms filled with projections of flowers, strings of beautifully flashing lights, small lanterns of changing colors, and a room that’s great for moving around, especially with kids, called the Athletics Forest.

Vienna on the Path to Modernism

This exhibition focuses on fin de siècle Vienna as the precursor to modernism, providing historical context through influences such as the Freemasons and the Emperor Joseph II’s reforms, through Biedermeier Era, the rise of Vienna’s business class, and the effect of the Vienna World’s Fair in 1873. The rest of the exhibition focuses on the artists of Vienna of the early 20th century: the architecture of Otto Wagner, Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, and Oskar Kokoschka. It also includes the the Vienna Secession, Wiener Werkstätte and Expressionism. There are over 400 items, including paintings, prints, clothing, household items, furniture and much more.

The Nature Rules: Dreaming of Earth Project

This exhibition highlights the Dreaming of Earth Project, a concept launched by Jae-Eun Choi. The project centers around the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) on the 38th parallel of the Korean peninsula. Because the land contains an estimated three million landmines, the land itself is human-free and is inhabited by over 5000 species of animals. To preserve this ecosystem, the project proposes different components, such as a vault for seeds, a floating garden and more. The exhibition includes work by several artists.

Meet the collection

In celebration of the Yokohama Museum of Art’s 30th anniversary, which neatly corresponds with the length of the Heisei era, the museum is marking this milestone with an exhibition from their extensive permanent collection. Works by Japanese artists are interspersed with those by well-known, international artists, with paintings, prints, photographs, sculptures and more on view. The exhibition is made up of two parts: LIFE and WORLD. WORLD ends June 23 and will be replaced by The Eye of a Connoisseur: The Legendary Hara Sankei Collection. LIFE is on view until September 1. Four Japanese artists have curated “encounters” between their own work and works by other artists from the museum collection. Yusuke Asai (partial view of his Tree of Life above) is one of these curators and his section is dramatic.