The Phillips Collection: A Modern Vision

In 1921 Duncan Phillips opened what is considered to be the first museum devoted in modern art in the United States. The Phillips Collection is located in Washington, DC and even those who have visited this museum will appreciate the works in this exhibition. The artworks are grouped by the decade they were acquired and this, together with the exhibition text, provides interesting insight into Duncan Phillips the art collector. His emphasis on collecting the most unique, rather than the most famous or representative, examples of an artist’s work provides the viewer with the opportunity to see some of the world’s most famous artists in new ways.

Rubens and the Birth of the Baroque

Thinking about Rubens usually invokes images of women who “embrace their curves” as we say in today’s vernacular. This exhibition offers another view of this master by focusing on his years in Italy, from 1600 to 1608. This time in Italy, the center of ancient, Renaissance and Baroque art, and his access to sculpture of the ancient world and masters such as Titian and Tintoretto, greatly influenced his art.

Catastrophe and the Power of Art

“What art can do in chaotic times where the future is uncertain.” Under the theme of catastrophe, such as the Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011, these artists use their talents to help us process these events through their personal vision and expression. The artwork concerns all types of tragedies, from personal experiences to large cataclysmic events. There are a wide variety of media - videos, photographs, paintings, sculptures, illustrations, models, and more - used to both depict disasters both large and small and process these events through creativity in the aftermath.

Yoshimura Yoshio: Beyond Hyper-realism

Yoshimura Yoshio’s drawings depict everyday scenes, hyper realistic recreations of newspapers, self-portraits on actual newspapers, and renditions of flowers that are so realistic that they look like photographs at first glance. Over 60 works and 600 items make up the retrospective of this incredibly gifted artist and must be seen in person to be fully appreciated.

Toguri Museum of Art

Do you like Japanese porcelain and want to learn more about it? This museum’s collection highlights Imari ware created in Arita (formerly Hizen province) beginning in the 1600s. Of the museums three gallery spaces, one is dedicated to explaining the different styles/stages of Imari ware. The other two rooms are exhibition spaces, usually focusing on one specific stage or themes that run across stages, such as flower and plant designs.

MINGEI - Another Kind of Art

This exhibition features over 140 objects selected by the Director of the Japan Folk Crafts Museum. The word mingei is used to describe handicrafts made by anonymous craftspeople, emphasizing that crafts use local materials and techniques handed down from generations. The film shown in Gallery 1 highlights craftspeople at work and informs the objects on display in Gallery 2.

Munch: A Retrospective

Edvard Munch’s The Scream is arguably one of the most famous works of art. This is your opportunity to admire it along with a wide variety of the artist’s work: self portraits, self photographs (early selfies), portraits, and landscapes. Other famous works, such as The Kiss and Madonna, are presented in multiple and in different media -- prints and oil paintings.

ArchitectureXPhotography: A Light Existing Only Here

This exhibition is an interesting exploration of the relationship between photography and architecture. Buildings have been the subject of photography from its inception, at first because they are static and later because of photography’s ability to document changes in urban environments. Taken mostly from the museum’s collection, the exhibition demonstrates the early history of architectural photography, then groups various types of architecture by photographer, including some famous sites from around the world.

Making the Difference: Vermeer and Dutch Art

A unique opportunity to see nine (out of 35 surviving) original paintings by the Dutch master, Johannes Vermeer. Rather than sprinkling the Vermeer paintings throughout, the Vermeers are grouped together in one beautiful room at the end of the exhibition. The other paintings by 17th century Dutch artists such as Frans Hals, Jan Steen, and Pieter de Hooch are shown in groups: portraits, Biblical scenes, still lifes, and daily life. These paintings serve as context and set the stage to even better admire Vermeer’s artistry and skill.